Massive East Bay Residential Project Breaks Ground to Inspire Smart Regional Growth

Dublin Brookfield Residential CalAtlantic Homes Boulevard Pleasanton BART Persimmon Place KTGY William Hezmalhalch Architects MacKay & Somps East Bay

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By Jacob Bourne

A ceremony was held on July 12 in the Camp Parks area of Dublin to celebrate groundbreaking on a 189 acre residential community that could build up to 1,995 housing units over the next seven years. It’s a joint project between large developers, Brookfield Residential and CalAtlantic Homes, that combines residential diversity, transit connectivity and a vigorous community-building framework into one large development. Described by Tom Burrill of CalAtlantic Homes as a “Master-planned community sure to set the bar for future Northern California developments,” the project, named Boulevard, will occupy land that was part of The Parks Reserve Forces Training Area, bordered by 6th Street south to Dublin Boulevard and Arnold Road west to Scarlett Drive.

[contextly_sidebar id=”2cXPpJhHNeQd8gilFTBDPvYOKmHhWrJy”]Boulevard is marked by a variety of housing options consisting of condos with two to four bedroom units, townhomes and single-family detached homes. The contemporary architectural styles focus on creating bright living spaces that connect dwellers with the outdoors via large windows and balconies.

Green open space is an important aspect of this community that’ll offer 13 private pocket parks each with a theme that reflects the spirit of an energetic urban context. The Office park features an outdoor work space equipped with WiFi, while The Library lends books at a depot study area. Grilling spaces at The Lounge and The Kitchen allow residents to mingle during mealtimes, and The Playground is a sure destination for youthful residents. Boulevard’s pedestrian-oriented streets and intersections weave into a private trail system that connects the Iron Horse Regional Trail, a public 32-mile park. For those seeking a more traditional suburban backyard feel, a 15,000 square foot recreation center aims to draw the whole community together for activities and scheduled events. Twelve acres of the development will be devoted to a new elementary school campus.

“Our vision is to develop an energetic, authentic community that is buzzing and full of life,” said John Ryan, Bay Area president of Brookfield Residential. “Boulevard is primed to welcome young professionals, tech executives, couples and growing families alike. The design, amenities and location make Boulevard unlike any other community in the area.”

The development is strategically situated, occupying a large portion of central Dublin and is about 0.5 miles from the Dublin/Pleasanton BART Station, crucial for transit-oriented growth. It’s also a short walk to Persimmon Place, a retail center featuring Whole Foods Market and several nearby farmer’s markets.

Boulevard is under the City’s Dublin Crossing Specific Plan, adopted to address the vital role this development is to play in connecting the greater area with its many pathways for pedestrians and bicyclists that connect with local roadways, parks, trails and transit.

The community is broken down into 24 neighborhoods, and construction for phase one of five has begun, with some homes expected to be released for sale in the second quarter of 2017. There’s currently no commercial development proposed for the project because of ample local retail, but this could change in the future as the area is zoned for mixed uses. Also working on phase one are KTGY Architects, William Hezmalhalch Architects, engineers MacKay & Somps and RJA.

Josh Roden, vice president of Brookfield Residential, emphasized the important and helpful role City departments and officials have played in working towards building a successful community.

“This is a very rare, smart growth development opportunity given its size and nearness to BART, jobs and retail,” said Roden. “We want to enhance the community feel by drawing diverse residents—from Millennials to retirees—to the social spaces.”